A Quick Car Checklist before Your Test

– By ANewDriver


It is a good idea to be familiar with the car you are using for your test. A New Driver has made a quick list of things to check up before you go ahead with it. By checking all the list below is in good order before you go to your driving test centre, you will reduce your changes of getting refused eligibility to sit the test: It happens more often than you know!

So here is what to watch out for:

  • Provisional Licence/Learners Permit: Make sure this is in date and has the correct category on it.
  • Tax: Make sure your car’s tax disc is in date and correct registration number.
  • Insurance: Make sute the insurance disc on the car is in date and has the correct registration number.
  • Nct: Only if the test car is required to have an NCT disc, make sure the NCT disc is in date and has the correct registration number.
  • Bonnet check: Check that oil for engine, coolant for engine radiator, water for windscreen washer, steering fluid, and clutch fluid is topped up. You must know where all fluids go for your test regardless.
  • Lights: Check brake lights and indicators are working correctly and are the correct colour.
  • Warning lights due to fault: Make sure there are no warning lights on before you go for your test as your car will be refused.
  • Seatbelts: Check that all seatbelts are working correctly.
  • Windows: Check that all windows are working correctly.
  • Tyres: Remember you should know the Tyre Check as there is a 90% chance you will be asked. Vehicles with bald or worn tyres will not be taken out on test.

car check up before test


A Quick Guide For Information Signs

By ANewDriver

An information sign is a very legibly printed and very noticeable placard that informs people of the purpose of an object, or gives them instruction on the use of something – like road signs showing directions and the location of services or other places of interest to tourists.


Advance direction signs

Motorway sign (blue) Motorway
National Road sign (green) National road
National road sign (green) National road
Regional road sign (white) Regional road

Direction signs (at junctions)

Motorway direction sign (blue) Motorway direction sign
National road direction sign (green) National road direction signs
Regional road direction sign (white) Regional road direction sign
Large white sign pointed right, with bold text saying next direction Local road direction sign
Destination distance sign (green) Destination distance sign
Town or village sign (green) Town or village sign
Slow lane sign Slow lane sign
Cul-de-sac sign Cul-de-sac
Sign showing industrial estate Industrial estate symbol
Sign showing parking bay for disabled persons Disabled persons parking bay
Sign for airport Airport symbol
Sign for car ferry Ferry symbol
Sign showing alternative route for high vehicles Alternative route for high vehicles
Sign showing lay-by ahead (100m) Lay-by ahead sign
Sign showing hospital ahead (100m) Hospital ahead sign
Sign for lay-by Lay-by sign
Sign for hospital Hospital sign
Sign for carpark with facilities for disabled persons Carpark with facilities for disabled persons
Sign for SOS (emergency) lay-by SOS lay-by
Sign showing restricted heights on route Sign for low bridges or low clearance ahead

Advance information sign for low clearance

Sign for traffic calming Traffic calming sign
Second sign for traffic calming Traffic calming sign
Supplementary plate for traffic calming Supplementary plate
Sign for ramps on road Ramps on road

Tourist information signs

Sign for lay-by with facilities ahead (3km) Advance sign for facilities in lay-by
Sign for lay-by with tourist information ahead (1km) Advance sign for lay-by with tourism information
Sign for Youth Hostel ahead (1km) Sign for Óige youth hostels
Sign for local services Advance direction to local services
Sign for approved tourist information Signing to approved tourist information
Brown sign, white text showing info about upcoming attraction Tourist advanced direction sign
Sign showing direction to tourist attraction (bird sanctuary) Tourist attraction direction sign
Sign for pedestrians showing direction to Tourist attraction (museum) Pedestrian sign to a tourist attraction
Sign for pedestrians for car park Pedestrian sign to a car park
Sign to approved tourist information Sign to approved tourist information point

Quick Guide For Road Works Warning Signs

– By ANewDriver


Warning signs for road work will warn you of hazards ahead, such as roundabouts, crossroads, dangerous bends or anything else that would call on you to drive more carefully.

You should always take special care when you see a warning sign. If you fail to observe these signs you could create an emergency. Like other warning signs, these are diamond or rectangular in shape and have a black border and black symbols or text. However, they are orange in colour instead of yellow.


Sign for roadworks ahead Roadworks ahead
Sign for one-lane crossover out One-lane crossover (out)
Sign for one-lane crossover back One-lane crossover back)
Sign to move to the left (one lane) Move to left (one lane)
Sign to move to the right (one lane) Move to right (one lane)
Sign to move to the left (two lanes) Move to left (two lanes)
Sign to move to the right (two lanes) Move to right (two lanes)
Sign for an obstruction between lanes Obstruction between lanes
Sign showing end of obstruction between lanes End of obstruction between lanes
Sign showing start of central reserve or obstruction Start of central reserve or obstruction
<empSign showing end of central reserve or obstruction End of central reserve or obstruction
Sign showing lanes diverging at crossover Lanes diverge at crossover
Sign showing lanes rejoining at crossover Lanes rejoin at crossover
Sign showing two lanes crossover (back) Two-lanes crossover (back)
Sign showing two lanes crossover (out) Two-lanes crossover (out)
Sign showing single lane Single lane (for shuttle working)
Sign showing two-way traffic Two-way traffic
Sign showing road narrows from left Road narrows from left
Sign showing road narrows from right Road narrows from right
Sign showing road narrows on both sides Road narrows on both sides
Sign showing nearside lane (of two) closed Nearside lane (of two) closed
Sign showing offside lane (of two) closed Offside lane (of two) closed
Sign showing offside lane (of three) closed Offside lane (of three) closed
Sign showing nearside lane (of three) closed Nearside lane (of three) closed
Sign showing two offside lanes (of three) closed Two offside lanes (of three) closed
Sign showing two nearside lanes (of three) closed Alternative Sign showing two nearside lanes (of three) closed Two nearside lanes (of three) closed.
Two alternative styles.
Sign showing offside lane (of four) closed Offside lane (of four) closed
Sign showing nearside lane (of four) closed Nearside lane (of four) closed
Sign showing Two offside lanes (of four) closed
Two nearside lanes Closed Two nearside lanes (of four) closed
Sign showing Side road on left Side road on left
Sign showing Side road on right Side road on right
Sign showing Site access on left Site access on left
Sign showing Site access on right Site access on right
Sign showing Temporary traffic signals ahead Temporary traffic signals ahead
Sign showing Flagman ahead Flagman ahead
Sign showing Queues likely Queues likely
Sign showing hump or ramp Hump or ramp
Sign showing uneven surface Uneven surface
Sign showing slippery road Slippery road
Sign showing loose chippings Loose chippings
Sign showing pedestrians cross to the left Pedestrians cross to left
Sign showing pedestrians cross to the right Pedestrians cross to right
Sign showing Overhead electric cables Overhead electric cables
Sign showing detour ahead Detour ahead
Sign showing Detour to left Detour to left
Sign showing Detour to left Detour to right
Sign showing road closed Road closed
Sign showing diverted traffic left Diverted traffic left
Sign showing diverted traffic Diverted traffic Right
Sign showing diverted traffic Diverted traffic
Sign showing diverted traffic Diverted traffic
Sign showing end of detour End of detour
Sign showing detour destination Detour destination

Information plates at roadworks

Sign showing distance (200m) Distance
Sign showing length (for X km) Length
Sign showing direction Direction
Sign showing direction and distance Direction and Distance
Sign showing end End
Sign showing cautionart speed (35km/h) Cautionary speed
Sign showing slow Slow
Sign showing concealed entrance Concealed entrance
Sign showing type of works Type of works
Sign showing use hard shoulder Use hard shoulder
Sign showing hard shoulder closed Hard shoulder closed
Sign showing unfinished road surface Unfinished road surface
Barrier boards (red and white) Barrier Boards
Chevron boards (black and yellow) Chevron board
Sign showing speed limit (30km/h) ahead (200m) Speed limit ahead

Manual traffic control sign at roadworks

Sign showing flagman ahead Flagman ahead
Sign showing Stop Stop
Sign showing Go Sign showing Téigh (go in Irish) Either form of Go or Téigh can be used

Quick Guide To Motorway Signs

By aNewDriver


A quick guide to Motorways Signs brings you on this Blog the most used signs on Irish roads, as part of our Understanding Traffic Signs posts. We hope you find it helpful and easy to access whenever you may need it.

Motorway signs are rectangular with blue backgrounds and white writing or symbols. Below are the most used signs on Irish roads:


Motorway ahead Motorway ahead
Sign for Motorway ahead Motorway ahead
Advance Direction Sign Advance direction sign
Entry to motorway Entry to motorway
300m to next exit 300m to next exit
200m to next exit 200m to next exit
100m to next exit 100m to next exit
Motorway ends 1km ahead Motorway ends 1km ahead
Motorway ends 500m ahead Motorway ends 500m ahead
End of motorway End of motorway
Route confirmatory sign for M7 Route confirmatory sign for M7
Advance direction sign for destination Advance direction sign for destination

A Quick Guide To Regulatory Traffic Signs

Regulatory signs show the course a driver must follow and an action they are required to take – or forbidden to take.

They are generally circular and have a red border with black symbols or letters on a white background.

Mandatory regulatory signs that indicate the direction traffic must take at junctions are blue and white.

Red Octagon showing stop Stop
White triangle with a red border displaying yieldYield
White triangle with a red border displaying Géill Slí (Yield in Irish) Yield
White circle with red border showing Stop above children School wardens stop sign
White circle with red border showing no left turn No left turn
White circle with red border showing no entry No Entry
White circle with red border showing no right turn No right turn
White circle with red border showing no parking Parking prohibited
White circle with red border showing clearway Clearway
White circle with red border showing 30km/h as the maximum speed Max speed limit 30km/h
White circle with red border showing 50km/h as the maximum speed Max speed limit 50km/h
White circle with red border showing 60km/h as the maximum speed Max speed limit 60km/h
White circle with red border showing 80km/h as the maximum speed Max speed limit 80km/h
White circle with red border showing 100km/h as the maximum speed Max speed limit 100km/h
White circle with red border showing 120km/h as the maximum speed Max speed limit 120km/h
White circle with red border showing taxi rank Taxi Rank
White circle with red border showing no entry for large vehicles, greater than 3 tonnes No entry for large vehicles(by reference to weight)
White circle with red border showing no u-turn No U-turn
White circle with red border showing no overtaking No overtaking
White circle with red border showing height restriction Height restriction
White circle with red border showing pedestrian zone Pedestrianised street
White circle with red border showing parking permitted Parking permitted
Rectangular sign showing disc paking information Disc parking plate
Sign showing no parking of large vehicles Zonal restriction – no parking of large vehicles
Sign showing end of large vechicle parking restrictions End of the restriction zone

Mandatory signs at junctions (white and blue)

White on blue junction sign showing left turn ahead Turn left ahead
White on blue junction sign showing right turn ahead Turn right ahead
White on blue junction sign showing turn left Turn left
White on blue junction sign showing turn right Turn right
White on blue junction sign showing pass either side Pass either side
White on blue junction sign showing straight ahead Straight ahead
White on blue junction sign showing keep right Keep right
White on blue junction sign showing keep left Keep left

Manual traffic control sign at roadworks

White circle with red border showing no entry for pedestrians No entry for pedestrians to tramway
Red circle showing stop Stop
Green circle showing go Either form of Go
Green circle showing Téigh (go in Irish) or Téigh can be used
White circle with red border showing no entry to goods vehicles with 3 axles No entry to goods vehicles (by reference to number of axles)
Blue sign showing with flow bus lane on the left With flow bus lane on left
Blue sign showing with flow bus lane on the right With flow bus lane on right
Blue sign showing contra flow bus lane on the right Contra flow bus lane
Blue sign showing tram lane on the left Tram lane on left
Blue sign showing tram lane on the right Tram lane on right
Sign showing start of cycle track Start of cycle track
Sign showing end of cycle track End of cycle track
Electronic variable sign showing maximum speed of 80km/h Electronic variable speed limit sign (tunnel only)
Sign showing in a tunnel goods vehicles in a tunnel can not use the right-hand lane In a tunnel goods vehicles cannot use right-hand lane (by reference to number of axles)
Electronic periodic speed limit sign showing a maximum speed of 30km/h Electronic periodic speed limit sign
Electronic periodic speed limit sign at a school showing a maximum speed of 30km/h Electronic periodic speed limit sign at school
Sign showing a tram only street Tram only street
Sign showing a tram and access only street Tram and access only street
Sign showing a bus only street Bus only street

Traffic lane control signs in a tunnel

Tunnel traffic lane showing go, lane open Go (Lane open)
Tunnel traffic lane showing stop, lane closed Stop (Lane closed)
Tunnel traffic lane showing move into left-hand lane Move into the left-hand lane
Tunnel traffic lane showing move to right-hand lane Move into the right-hand lane

How to Choose a New Car – Part 1

By AnewDriver


As much as it may sound like an easy task in general, shopping for a new car can be quite tricky if you are not so sure what to go for.

To start with, ask yourself what kind of car you want and what type of car you need. There is a huge different between the two options, as what you like might not necessarily be what you need. But according to car experts, considering what you like and dislike will make you happier long term, even if the car you are going for doesn’t necessarily fulfill your daily needs. But be careful here not to find yourself unable to perform your daily routine because of your car choice – for example: If you are a construction worker and need space to transport logs and huge pieces of wood and stuff, then a pickup truck will be the best option for you.

Moving on, ask yourself what you need by way of performance and space in the car. This is also the time to ask yourself who will be your passengers. This is especially important for those who have a big family with children and need to add on car seats. More space is needed if you are carrying your whole family with you, so a car with more space inside is preferable. If you have a large family and/or regularly transport about 5-6 people, get a van or minivan. A minivan can be safer in that it has a low center of gravity almost like a car.

how to choose a new car

But if only you are going to drive that car, and you are not going to transport more than one person somewhere, a two-seater should be fine. Consider, however, that a smallish back seat adds little or nothing to the cost and fuel consumption of the car, allows the passenger seat to recline more, and greatly increases cargo capacity (sometimes with the seats dropping and connecting to the trunk). A two-seater is more for extreme compactness, style and handling than lack of need of a rear seat.

If you usually transport 3-4 people but don’t need that much trunk space, a compact to mid-size should be fine. If you usually transport around 4 people and need lots of trunk space, then you should get a full-size sedan, a minivan, or an SUV. A minivan is roomiest of these and more efficient than the SUV – some have a stretched nose to look less minivan like. A full-size sedan is most comfortable, but an SUV often has four wheel drive and is good at low speed, for poor road conditions.

After you have a better idea which type of car you should go for, it is time to check your budget. Before going to the showrooms for test drives and car checks, have a primary budget in mind. This will help you to remain reasonable about the choices and not give in to a car you really cannot afford. If you’re on a Suzuki or Hyundai budget, it’ll help you not to tiptoe toward an Audi or Mercedes.

You should also consider fuel efficiency. If you need a fuel-efficient car, a hybrid will be right for you. You’ll want to consider however whether it is worth it or not. If you have a commute longer than thirty miles to work daily, or if you spend a great deal of a short commute in traffic every morning, then hybrids are a great option versus economy sized four cylinder cars. Extra cylinders and displacement greatly decrease fuel economy overall, and extra frontal area greatly decreases fuel economy at speed. A long, low car such as a big sedan or wagon with a relatively small, cheap engine can be stylish, comfortable and safe. For a personal, urban car, petrol or gas is best over diesel.

We will back with the second part of ‘How to Choose a New Car’ soon! We hope you found it helpful.


a new driver facebook share driving lessons dublin, dublin driving school, edt driving lessons

Best Time for a Driving Test


By AnewDriver – Source: Driving Test Tips

Have you ever wondered what time is the best time of the day to take your driving test? Although some may say that the best time for a driving test is irrelevant as you should possess the ability to handle any situation, driving test nerves play a significant factor and so choosing an appropriate time for the test is important. The best driving test time is dependent on many factors. Initially consult your driving instructor if you have one. Your driving instructor is likely to have a thorough knowledge of the traffic situation throughout the day and will match this to your driving ability.

Early Driving Test – Early driving test times of 08:10 and 09:07 will see you taking your driving test during rush hour. How much of a rush hour is relative to where you live. Although you may occasionally hear that a test candidate remained stuck in traffic jams throughout the duration of their test, making it easy, is not often the case.driving test

The examiner doesn’t want to be stuck in traffic as this will not fully test your ability at driving and runs the risk of returning to the test center late. During early driving test times, an examiner will choose driving test routes that are less likely to result in traffic queues, making the driving test run smoother and on time.

Early driving test times are more likely to encounter frantic drivers trying to get to work, parents on the school run and a higher percentage of cyclists and pedestrians. Early test times are much more likely to involve traffic queues to some degree however, and so you need to weigh up the odds of the likely hood of the ‘advantage’ being stuck in traffic queues and the disadvantage of competing with high volumes of frantic drivers and cyclists. If however there are some areas within the test routes of your test center that you are not confident on such as busy multi-lane roundabouts, these maybe disregarded during early morning rush hour tests to avoid delays.

Ideal Driving Test Time – Probably the best driving test time is outside of rush hour. Driving test times of 10:14 and 13:35 being the ideal choice as this will also avoid the slight traffic increase that may occur during lunchtime. These test times with minimal traffic will likely see the examiner taking you over a broader amount of road types such as dual carriageways for example. Roads such as dual carriageways can often be disregarded from the test routes during rush hour due to the risk of traffic queues or accidents. Although these may be an increase the variety of roads taken during quieter times of the day, providing you are familiar and confident with test routes, the reduced amount of traffic should make 10:14 and 13:35 the best driving test times.


a new driver facebook share driving lessons dublin, dublin driving school, edt driving lessons

COMPETITION TIME! WIN 6 EDT LESSONS WORTH €160!


A NEW DRIVER is offering an EDT 6 lesson package* worth €160 to a lucky winner in March! All you have to do is: LIKE our Facebook Page, SHARE IT and Make a Comment Tagging a friend who also needs to take driving lessons!

Winner will be announced by the end of March!


What is EDT?

Essential Driver Training – EDT – is a mandatory training course that teaches fundamental driving skills to learner car drivers. It is part of the RSA’s Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL) scheme and is intended to improve road safety.

Even if you are not required to complete EDT, you may still choose to take an EDT course, as it can help increase your chances of passing the driving test and will help make you a better safer driver.

A NEW DRIVER is run by James Hickey – a fully qualified and patient Driving Instructor with over 10 years of experience.

*terms and conditions apply


COMPETITIONTIME!

close

Enjoy this blog? Please spread the word :)

error: Content is protected !!