Drink-Driving Rule

Drink-Driving Rule

A new drink-driving rule in Ireland is now on.

New rules on drink-driving took effect last night in Ireland. From now on, it will automatically disqualify any motorists who are found to have consumed alcohol.

The commencement of the provisions of the Road Traffic (Amendment) Act 2018 from midnight was announced by Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sports, Shane Ross.

The laws, which ensure that all drink drivers, without exception, will receive a driving disqualification, replace previous legislation which provided for penalty points for some drivers instead of a disqualification. Those drivers will now face a disqualification from driving for three months.

Before now, a driver detected with a blood alcohol concentration of between 50 and 80 milligrams was punished with a €200 fine and three penalty points.

Speaking yesterday, Minister Ross said the measures were a “significant step in clamping down on the scourge of drink driving“.

“There are few more irresponsible and dangerous things people can do in everyday life than drink and drive. It was always wrong to give people the mild slap on the wrist of three penalty points for such potentially lethal behaviour, and it is a great satisfaction to know that in future people who behave this way will face a disqualification from driving for three months. Let me be clear – we are not interested in punishing people, what we want is for people to behave responsibly.”

Moyagh Murdock, Chief Executive, Road Safety Authority said alcohol consumption by road users is still a substantial problem in Ireland.

“The most up to date statistics indicate it’s a factor in 39% of driver fatalities. The introduction of a three-month disqualification for drivers detected with a blood alcohol concentration between 50mg and 80mg sends out a clear signal that drink driving is something that is no longer acceptable or tolerable in our communities. This measure will save lives and prevent injuries. Importantly it will assist in achieving the Government’s road safety strategy target of reducing deaths to 124 or fewer annually by the end of 2020. ”

Ms Murdock also advised motorists to take extra care on the roads over the October Bank Holiday weekend. This was reiterated by Chief Superintendent Finbarr Murphy from the Roads Policing Bureau who said that gardai would focus on all intoxicated driving this weekend. He also said on An Garda Síochána welcomed the change in legislation.

Source: Breaking News Ireland

Safe Driving in School Zones

Safe Driving in School Zones

It is important to understand the good practices of driving in school zones and special limits zone.

As the final preparations for a new school term begin, in homes and schools around the country, the RSA Road Safety Authority is calling on drivers, parents, guardians and teachers, to make sure road safety is top of the ‘back to school’ checklist. The RSA is reminding parents to ensure their child is visible when walking or cycling on the roads, or when waiting for the school bus.

According to Moyagh Murdock, Chief Executive of the Road Safety Authority Ireland, parents and guardians have the responsibility to ensure the youngest and most vulnerable road-users are safe when travelling to and from school. One of the easiest ways to do this is to ensure they wear high visibility material when walking, cycling or getting the bus to school. This will help other road-users to see them and to slow down when they are nearby.

Drivers in School AreasDriving in School Zones

Motorists should also be on the look-out for children making their journey to school and to modify their behaviour accordingly. Drivers should know and respect at all times the speed limit around special areas and schools. It is important for drivers to keep in mind that they must watch out for all children in special areas in public, as children often do not have the skills to cross roads safely.

Here are some Back to School Tips from the RSA:

  • Understand the driving limit in the area you are driving, and always watch out for children and families crossing on special areas and nearby;
  • Research shows that children under 12 should be accompanied if walking or cycling to school as they don’t have the necessary skills or experience to manage traffic or cross the roads safely. So make sure your child is accompanied by a responsible adult until they’re old enough to go on their own;
  • If your child travels to school by bus or car, make sure they use the correct restraint at all times, for example, a child car seat, booster cushion or safety belt;
  • Show them the correct way to get on and off the bus, in particular, where they should stand to safely wait for its arrival and before crossing the road;
  • If your child walks or cycles to school, make sure they are wearing the proper safety and high visibility gear – a helmet and high vis if they cycle, and a high vis vest or armband if they walk. Make sure their bicycle has working lights, both front and rear, and a bell;
  • For older children who may walk or cycle to school, it is important that they learn how to share the road safely with other road users, for example, how to use hand signals to indicate a manoeuvre and always obey the Rules of the Road;
  •  Teach your child the ‘Safe Cross Code’ and make it a part of their ‘going to school’ routine.

Remember, the best person to teach your child how to use the roads safely is you. So set a good example and always demonstrate safe road use when using the roads.

Clean Windscreen and Safe Driving

Clean Windscreen and Safe Driving

Having a clean windscreen is very important for safe driving. Trying to see ahead is difficult when you have a combination of sunlight and a screen covered in dirt: smeared bug guts and general greasy road grime can decrease your visibility resulting in unsafe driving. The current dry weather in Ireland certainly does not help with keeping your windscreens clear and clean.

So, what can you do to help make vision through your windscreen better at this time of year? First of all, resist the temptation to wash your car constantly as we must save water due to the dry weather. Second, you can follow these simple steps to cleaning windscreens, so you can drive safely with a clear view of the road ahead:

Clean Windscreen and Safe DrivingClean the inside of the windscreen first – Use a microfiber cloth to wipe the windscreen interior and remove dust particle build-up, which can impact your vision of the road.

Spray a cleaning product – Spray the interior of the glass with a windscreen cleaning product. You can find it in any local auto store or supermarket.

Clean again – Use the clean side of the microfiber cloth, or a new cloth entirely, to wipe the windscreen around the edges. Once the edges have been cleaned, spray the area again and proceed to wipe the remainder of the windscreen. To make it shine and streak free, take a clean cloth and wipe over all the internal windscreen glass.

Clean the outside – For the external glass, give the windscreen a quick wipe over and spray the windscreen with the windscreen cleaning product. Use a pint of water – not more than that to avoid water waste – and rinse down the windscreen from top to bottom with clean water to completely remove all dirt and build up.

Dry well inside and outside – use a lint-free cloth to dry the windscreen completely. Adding a small amount of white vinegar on the clean cloth ensures a streak-free shine.

Enjoy a clean windscreen and safe driving!

 

Safety Tips for Summer Car Traveling

Safety Tips for Summer Car Traveling

Driving during the summer in hot weather conditions can pose significant challenges and risks to the health and safety of drivers and passengers, so it is important to keep in mind these safety tips for summer car traveling.

Safety Tips for Summer Car Traveling

Safety Tips for Summer Car TravelingPlenty of fluids

Plenty of fluids is one of the most import safety tips for summer car traveling. Fluids are important for you and for your car as well. Cars and drivers must top up on fluids before taking any trips. For drivers, driving while you are hot will cause you to become dehydrated more quickly. Make sure you take on fluids regularly because dehydration reduces your ability to think and react, and therefore increases the risk you’ll have an accident.

For the cars, the engines get extremely hot in warm weather. Ensure your coolant is always topped up and turn off your engine during traffic. Windscreens also get very dirty in dry weather and marks can amplify sun glare. Plenty of windscreen washer fluid or water will help you maintain a clear view of the sun.

Drive cool

Starting with a cool car is another important safety tip for summer car traveling. Give yourself the best chance of a relaxing drive in the sun by not getting into an already baking hot car. Parking in the shade, opening your doors and windows or running your air-con for a few minutes before setting off will cool your car down, so that you can avoid getting worked up by the heat before a journey. Keep your vehicle well ventilated to avoid drowsiness and possible sunstrokes. Sunstroke is when your body overheats, and it can be particularly problematic for motorcyclists in heavy protective gear if riding in slow traffic where the wind chill doesn’t provide any cooling effect.

Be mindful of summer allergies

Allergies can be very problematic when driving. The last place you want to be constantly sneezing is behind the wheel of a car while driving. Another problem can be if you are taking anti-histamines tablets, as their known to give side effects such as blurred vision and drowsiness, which would evidently impair a person’s ability to drive. Always keep the following in mind:

  • Only take medication which doesn’t cause drowsiness
  • Consider getting someone else to drive if you are having a particularly bad hayfever day
  • Consider cabin pollen filters for your make of vehicle
  • Keep tissues close to hand
  • Slow down and drop back if you’re about to sneeze
  • Wear sunglasses to block out bright sunlight
  • Close windows and air vents to reduce pollen grains getting into the vehicle
  • Vacuum car mats and carpets regularly during summer, to get rid of dust

Tyre condition

Tyre blowouts are a common occurrence in hot weather. According to the AA, tyres with existing damage that are under inflated will become even more aggravated at higher temperatures, which increases the likelihood of blowouts and punctures. Keep your tyre pressure at the optimum level for summer driving.

You can also read more about driving distractions and safety here.

ANewDriver wishes you a season ahead: Drive safe and enjoy summerwith these safety tips for summer car traveling!


EDT Courses Ireland

EDT Courses Ireland

What is the EDT?

EDT stands for Essential Driver Training. It is a mandatory training course that teaches fundamental driving skills to learner car drivers. It is part of the RSA’s Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL) scheme and is intended to improve road safety. EDT is not required if your first learner permit was issued before 4 April 2011. All other learner drivers must complete EDT before taking their driving test. EDT courses Ireland provided by A New Driver are designed to assist you in meeting this requirement.

Should I choose EDT Courses?

Studies show that young drivers and inexperienced drivers are more likely to die or be seriously injured in collisions, and EDT is one of several measures introduced by the RSA to help improve critical driving knowledge, skills and behaviours of new drivers.

EDT is a course of 12 one-hour lessons. These lessons are designed to cover certain critical driving skills and improve your practical driving skills.

As you complete each lesson, your Approved Driving Instructor, James, will record your progress in a specially issued logbook. After you finish your EDT course, you may still need additional lessons with an ADI to improve your driving skills.

Benefits of EDT Courses Ireland

Completing your essential driver training course will help you to:

  • understand what it means to be a better safer driver.
  • practice your driving skills in a structured way that is focussed on your own learning needs.
  • develop lifelong skills that will make you a better safer driver.

Preparation for your first lesson

When you book your lessons with A New Driver, we will let you know what lessons, practice and background reading you should do before starting the course. We will check your learner permit, and if you are using your own car, will check to make sure your insurance, motor tax, NCT and the roadworthiness of the vehicle are all in order. We will give you a logbook with your name, address, date of birth and learner permit driver number. You should bring this logbook to each lesson and make sure all the appropriate sections are filled out after each lesson.

EDT lessons timeline

  • Lessons 1-8 must be taken in sequence, but lessons 9-12 may be taken in any order.
  • Each of the 12 lessons in EDT lasts about one hour.
  • We recommend that you leave at least two weeks between each EDT lesson to allow for further instruction, practice and learning.
  • The EDT course is best spread out over six months.

Each of the EDT lessons has particular objectives

The 12 lessons are titled:

  • LESSON 1: CAR CONTROLS AND SAFETY CHECKS
  • LESSON 2: CORRECT POSITIONING
  • LESSON 3: CHANGING DIRECTION
  • LESSON 4: PROGRESSION MANAGEMENT
  • LESSON 5: CORRECT POSITIONING
  • LESSON 6: ANTICIPATION AND REACTION
  • LESSON 7: SHARING THE ROAD
  • LESSON 8: DRIVING SAFELY THROUGH TRAFFIC
  • LESSON 9: CHANGING DIRECTION (MORE COMPLEX SITUATIONS)
  • LESSON 10: SPEED MANAGEMENT
  • LESSON 11: DRIVING CALMLY
  • LESSON 12: NIGHT DRIVING

You should prepare for each lesson using the RSA EDT Syllabus PDF Booklet


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Give the Gift of a Lift this Christmas: Road Safety Campaign 2017

Give the Gift of a Lift this Christmas: Road Safety Campaign 2017

By AnewDriver

The gift of a lift: The RSA and An Garda Síochána’s annual Christmas and New Year Road Safety Campaign focus on drinking and driving this year. Alcohol is a contributory factor in 38% of fatal crashes in the lead up to Christmas, according to the analysis of Garda investigation files for fatal crashes in the months of November and December: Alcohol factors in 2 in 5 fatal crashes in the lead up to Christmas.

the Gift of a Lift

The Minister for Transport in Ireland, Shane Ross, said: “The ultimate aim of our appeal this year is to warn the public about the impact alcohol has on road safety. The statistics revealed today by the RSA and Gardai clearly indicate that alcohol remains the primary contributory factor in fatal crashes and is responsible for far too many deaths and injuries on Irish roads. Given the more difficult driving conditions typical of this time of year, November and December are already particularly dangerous months for driving. However, the statistics show that road safety is diminished further in these months due to the consumption of alcohol and speeding. I appeal to all those socialising during the Christmas and New Year period to do so responsibly and never, ever, drink and drive“.

  • Another analysis of preliminary Garda data from 2008-2016, reveals that a total of 292 road users were killed in the months of November and December. The average number of fatalities each month for this nine-year period was 16 in November and 16 in December.  The new RSA analysis also shows that:
  • Dublin, Cork and Galway had the highest number of RTC fatalities in November and December and accounted for almost a third (32%) of the total number of fatalities that occurred during this time period.
  • The most prevalent times of day were between 4pm-8pm (33%) and 12pm-4pm (23%), followed by 12am-6am (22%). 
  • RTC fatalities were more prevalent on Sundays (21%). The most dangerous time of day on Sundays was midnight-6am.
  • Drivers represent almost half (46%) of all road users killed in Nov/Dec;
  • Pedestrians represent over a quarter (26%) of fatalities, while passengers account for almost one fifth (18%).

Ms Liz O Donnell, Chairperson, Road Safety Authority, said: “Any amount of alcohol impairs driving. In fact, just one drink can affect your driving. That is not a theory this is scientific fact. So, if you are heading to an office party or socialising over the Christmas and New Year period, make sure you plan how you are going to get home safely. Leave the keys at home and book a taxi, hackney, use public transport or designate a driver. Do not leave it to chance because once you have that first drink, you will not be able to make the right choices. This advice also applies if you are intending to walk home after socialising too. Crash data shows that alcohol could be a factor in almost half [46%] of pedestrian deaths. Too many people have lost their lives in the past by walking home drunk on roads with poor visibility. Please don’t take the chance.”

Assistant Commissioner Michael Finn, Garda National Roads Policing Bureau, An Garda Síochána, said: “An Garda Síochána is launching its six-week Christmas and New year road safety campaign. This will include a focus on Mandatory Intoxicant Testing checkpoints around the country to deter people from drinking and driving. The Gardaí will not just be targeting drink drivers at night or in the early hours of the morning during the Christmas period, but also during morning rush hour as many drivers could still be over the legal limit if they have been drinking the night before. There has been a 12% increase in drivers arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence up to end of October 2017. While it is disappointing to see so many refusing to heed our advice, this clearly shows that our members are out there enforcing drink driving laws. The consequences of drink driving for you and others could be very serious and range from losing your licence to living with the guilt of being responsible for someone’s death or severe injury. Please don’t take the risk this Christmas – don’t drink and drive.”

Pedestrian & Cyclist Safety

To promote pedestrian and cyclist safety over the festive period the RSA has teamed up with the Vintners Federation of Ireland (VFI) to distribute 50,000 high visibility jackets to almost 4,000 publicans for distribution free of charge to their patrons to ensure they get home safely over the Christmas and New Year period.

The RSA and An Garda Síochána’s are supporting Coca Cola’s 13th annual Designated Driver campaign which is encouraging the nation to give the ‘Gift of a Lift’ this Christmas to help keep our roads safe. The campaign running across Ireland and Northern Ireland have been offering free soft drinks, water or juice to designated drivers from the 28th November.

To date this year, 143 people have been killed on Irish roads, a decrease of 26 when compared to the same period last year.

If you wish to learn more about road safety, read our blog about Driving Tips For New Drivers.


Source: www.garda.ie

 

Warming Your Car During The Winter

Warming Your Car During The Winter

– By ANewDriver

Warming up your car during the winter? Is warming up your car in the cold useful or does it harm the engine? Learn more about it.

Warming Your Car During The Winter is the common wisdom is that when you are gearing up to take your car out in the cold and possibly snow, you should step outside, start up your engine, and let it idle to warm up. But contrary to popular belief, this does not prolong the life of your engine; in fact, it may decrease it by stripping oil away from the engine’s cylinders and pistons.

When your engine is cold, petrol is less likely to evaporate and create the correct ratio of air and vaporised fuel for combustion. Modern engines with electronic fuel injection have sensors that compensate for the cold by pumping more gasoline into the mixture. The engine continues to run rich in this way until it heats up to about 4 or 5 degrees Celsius.

Warming Your Car During The WinterDriving your car is the fastest way to warm the engine up to 4/5 degrees so it switches back to a normal fuel to air ratio. Even though warm air generated by the radiator will flow into the cabin after a few minutes, idling does surprisingly little to warm the actual engine. The best thing to do is start the car, take a minute to knock the ice off your windows, and get going. Have a good cloth or window wiper sponge (available in all garages or motor factors) for inside use to quickly remove the inside mist/fog that builds up on your windscreen, to avoid dangerous visibility.

Of course, hopping into your car and gunning it straightaway will put unnecessary strain on your engine. It takes 5 to 15 minutes for your engine to warm up, so take it nice and easy for the first part of your drive.

The long-held notion that you should let your car idle in the cold is only true for vehicles carburettor engines. Warming up your car before driving is a leftover practice from a time when carbureted engines dominated the roads, in the 70’s and 80’s. Carburetors mix gasoline and air to make vaporised fuel to run an engine, but they don’t have sensors that tweak the amount of gasoline when it’s cold out. As a result, you have to let older cars warm up before driving or they will stall out. But it’s been about 30 years since carbureted engines were common in cars.


 

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